Lets Get Filipino Food! Your Definitive Guide to the Point Point Joint.

Posted by on August 8, 2012 in Pacific Island/Asian Cuisine, Restaurant Reviews, Restaurants and Food Trucks | 0 comments

Lets Get Filipino Food! Your Definitive Guide to the Point Point Joint.

“Besides a friend’s house party or when my co-workers bring pancit at the company potluck, I don’t even know where to get Filipino food.”  I’ve heard this damn statement a billion times and its ridonculous!  Well, screw all that.  Here’s the PP&B Guide (the sh*t you need to know) to getting grub at the point point joint.

Why the hell are they called point-points or turo-turo, or if you want to get fancy, carinderia?  Because you literally POINT with either your finger or pursed lips (its a Filipino thing) at the items you would like that are on display. It’s a reverse buffet and instead of just grabbing the things you like, you have to point and a food server plates them up for you.

Display Ah yes, the infamous buffet display. Point points do not make things to order, hence why they are considered fast food. They are the Panda Express of Filipino Food. The dishes are cooked family style and volume is king. Point points make it a point, pun intended, to  fill several chaffing dishes with a variety of popular Filipino eats. Filipino food consists of many stews and soups, and chaffing dishes, with their low heat and long cooking time, help contribute to marination. Adobo, Sinigang, Dinuguan and Tinola are a few examples of dishes that are better with time.

Design Most point points would be considered fast casual jointz or “a hole in the wall“. They offer good eats, at affordable prices and are usually located in a strip mall.

Combos  Point points love them a combination platter. Unless you ordered catered food to be picked up (more about this later) a combination platter is the way to go. It’s usually cheaper than ordering a la carte, with a regular combo usually consisting of two main items and fresh steamed rice. Fries and a coke are NOT included, but you’ll def get free vinegar.

Whole Roasted Lechon

Whole Roasted Lechon

Catering This is how most of you probably experienced some Filipino food. Filipinos are big on celebrations and inviting everyone.  These parties need food and point points are the best at catering. They  have separate catering menus that offer everything including whole roasted pig aka Lechon.

Now that we’ve covered the basics….lets do this STEP BY STEP:

1. Ask a Filipino homie where they pick up Filipino food. Ask about their favorite dishes at that particular restaurant. Store the information and descriptions in your phone.

2. Google address, get directions, drive to strip mall, park, grab your phone & wallet, walk in. You’re about to get introduced to a new and delicious food adventure.

3. Depending on the time and crowd, grab a number (if needed) and get in line. While waiting, look over the various dishes on display. If something looks good, but unfamiliar, ask about it. Most food servers are polite, but don’t expect some elaborate explanation.

4. Decide whether you’ll be dining in or taking out.

5. Then…go for it! Order up a two item combo: example: ”I’ll have pork adodo and sinigang“.

6. Pay your bill, drop a tip, take those styrofoam containers home and pig out!

 

Pig Parts & Beer checks out many food spots and attends even more events, so we try to write positively about most of our experiences; frankly, some of the stuff is whack. We don’t publish extremely negative reviews, not yet at least; that”s not the goal of our site. But don’t get it twisted, we’re here to give you information, firm and fair, so you can shoot us an email regarding most things Filipino-American food to get our, eh hem, ‘non published’ thoughts.

 

 

 


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